Thursday, October 22

Breaking The Food Seduction: The Hidden Reasons Behind Food Cravings



Like many vegetarians, I wasn't completely Vegan, but a lacto-ovo vegetarian. Even though I knew dairy should be cut out of my diet, I'd lapse and have a veggie pizza, yogurt or something else with dairy in it once in awhile. And then there was that sugar-problem haunting me, knowing better, but . . . .

After reading Breaking the Food Seduction: The Hidden Reasons Behind Food Cravings, I now understand why I had a hard time completely breaking free of dairy products. By understanding the science of food, it made it easy to stop ingesting dairy products as well as foods with sugar and wheat.

The book reveals how certain foods trigger the release of natural opiates in the brain, causing a physical addiction that can be difficult to break. Casein, a protein found in milk, breaks down into smaller molecules called casomorphins during digestion. Barnard states that these morphine-like compounds then attach to the same receptors that heroin attaches to in the brain which may explain why so many people are seemingly addicted to dairy products, especially cheese. Dr. Barnard explains how sugar, chocolate and meat are amongst the most addictive foods.

This knowledge altered my view immensely, actually making it easy to stop eating all dairy and sugar-laden foods. Reading Sugar Blues will also open your mind.

It's been two months and I no longer crave foods I formerly couldn't resist. More importantly I don't feel deprived of them - I simply am no longer interested in them. It's amazing.

I feel better and have lost weight without even trying. It's easy to change to a completely vegan lifestyle once you understand food addictions - and, as you've heard - changing your eating habits is the key. Along with a walk in the sunshine~

The knowledge in this book will help you
break the cravings, not just fight the cravings.



Breakf
ast is important!
In a big bowl, I add
locally grown Organic Fruit in season,
Quick Organic Oats, (don't need cooking)
Organic hemp milk or another non-dairy milk
Locally grown Honey
Let it sit for awhile so the oats get soft.
I usually eat a few spoonfuls at a time,
get dressed, a few more, etc.
I'm satisfied til around 2pm!

Food is essential to life. Family & friends are lifes joy-filled toppings.

Get-togethers means eating, and eating healthy can be a challenge if you're not at home. So what I do is either eat before I go anywhere, or bring some yummy dish to share with others, thus making sure you have something on your new eating program to eat, and share with others. Going completely RAW VEGAN is now my mantra.

Breaking The Food Seduction offers lots of tips and quick, yummy recipes, as do Dr. Barnard's other books.


Also a good book to have around for reference is Foods That Fight Pain.

Dr. Barnard is the president of Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), a nonprofit organization that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research.

Sunday, March 1

Coconut Palm Tree Silhouette



For thousands of years, coconuts have been an integral part of the diet in tropical climates, providing the nourishment needed to sustain a healthy life.

Friday, June 20

Veterans Must Fight for the Care They Deserve


When Everything Falls Apart

“Our convoy went through the [Green Zone, Baghdad] Gateway 310 times. I always thought it could be my last day. Our adrenaline was so high. When I was out there I could only think of IED’s, getting shot at, or getting harassed by the locals,” said Stephen Imamoto, specialist in convoy security. Imamoto was a Sargeant 1st Class with the 100th Battalion, 442nd in 2005.
“We were hit with 4 – 6 roadside IED’s (Improvised Explosive Devices). I have traumatic brain injury (TBI) – our truck was rocked really bad.” With a sigh, Imamoto said, “I probably aged 10 years, I really did.” Now retired, Imamoto shared his experiences in Iraq with The Honolulu Weekly, hoping it may help other veterans.

Stephen Imamoto, Sargeant 1st Class with the 100th Battalion, 442nd in Baghdad, 2005

“I wanted to retire when I had 20 years, but they Stop-Lossed me for two more years.” A weekend warrior no more, Imamoto was not allowed to leave the Army Reserves.


Tuesday, April 8

Blue Planet Summit


Blue Planet Foundation's mission statement is
. . . To change our world's energy culture

Hawai'i is a microcosm of our Earth. A location many think of as paradise. A perfect place to completely change our dependence on oil. Hawai'i has abundant natural resources ~ wind, waves, sunshine and geothermal (volcanic).

The island of O'ahu (The Gathering Place), opened its arms with aloha to host The Blue Planet Global Energy Summit from April 3rd through the 5th. This was Blue Planet Foundation's first annual Summit for strategizing as well as beginning to put into effect programs regarding energy issues.

Major changes are needed to meet our energy needs today and for our future. Moving toward change requires cooperation, communication, and understanding across various interest groups, industries and national boundaries. This can be done, according to Blue Planet Foundation, if there is a new vision for the way energy is generated, distributed and used.

Philanthropist Henk Rogers founded the Blue Planet Foundation because of his commitment to our environment. As a result of his entrepreneurship in the computer-technology-world, Rogers was able to pull together a very positive Summit for brainstorming and promoting the use of non-carbon, environmentally-friendly, clean energy sources while also talking about the economic benefits of protecting our environment. The three-day event was taped for two high-profile upcoming television shows. DVD's for academic, legislative and civic use will also be available offering inspiration to people around our world. Rogers believes the human imagination has the power and ability to solve our energy challenge.

Over sixty influential leaders in the environmental and energy fields participated in the Summit. Well-known speakers such as Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (environmental attorney, author, activist), Denis Hayes (Earth Day Founder, Professor, President of the Bullitt Foundation), Solomon Enos (kanaka maoli artist, helping organic MA'O Farms get off the ground), Dr. Heidi Cullen (scientist, climate expert at the Weather Channel), Ramsay Taum (Director of External Relations and Community Partnerships at the University of Hawa'i School of Travel Industry Management and Co-Director of Sustain Hawai'i), and Dr. Stephen H. Schneider (Nobel Prize winner and Professor) were just a few of the speakers that participated in the Summit.

Not Just Talk, but Action!

Blue Planet Foundation has teamed up with Evolution Sage to create an innovative Energy Returned on Energy Invested Program with Nanakuli High School that not only educates, but involves students in conserving energy as well as integrating what they learn about alternative solutions in order to make their school and their homes more energy efficient.

Kevin Vaccarello, Executive Director of Evolution Sage, (video) and Founder, Co-Executive Director of Sustain Hawai'i presented a brief overview of the Energy Invested Program's hands-on approach that will teach the students at Nanakuli High School how they can personally affect change in the real world.

To make this learning experience even more beneficial to the students, they will be asked to submit a "Walk Story with Blue Planet" Essay via Blue Planetʻs website and explain what the energy, water and money saved means to them, their family, their community and their world. The best 20+ essays will win a partial energy and water efficiency retrofit for their homes in the way of LED bulbs, faucet aerators, and low-flow showerheads (they're better than they used to be) .

Their project isn't over yet!! After having their homes retrofitted, the Nanakuli High School students will track the difference in energy and water consumption from the previous year to determine how much energy, water and money their family is saving.

The families will pledge to use those savings to further support the studentʻs education or use it for more sustainability-oriented solutions. Each household should save nearly $300/yr for over 20 years, which cumulatively for all households is more than $150,000 over the lifetime of the LED bulbs, low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators.

This pilot program can be used in schools throughout the country and world.

By actually participating in bettering ones life, the students as well as their teachers, will bring a new perspective to their energy uses, and the knowledge they have acquired will ripple through their family and community in many positive ways. Nanakuli's Principal, Darin Pilialoha is an enthusiastic supporter of the program.

I wouldn't be surprised if this Program generates even more innovative energy idea's generated by the students themselves.
Student's Share Their Concerns
An important component in the discussion, was that of Students from around the world. It's vital that the younger generations have a prominent voice at all discussions - they are the future leaders, and have much to offer.

The student environmental activists from near and far were: Chelsea Chee (Navajo Nation), Erda Rindrasih (Indonesia) Cristian Beccera Monroy (Mexico), Anna Rose (Australia), Silvia Gianetti Barber (University of Hawai'i) & Shanah Trevenna (University of Hawai'i)

Tracking Our Progress in Hawai'i
Hawaii can play a lead role in advancing the use of the many alternative energies presently available to us. As people voice their commitment to change, the political leaders will follow. Blue Planet Foundation and the participants of the Summit will return next year to share their accomplishments, and talk about the positive changes they've seen.

Every Positive Action Does Help!

For in-depth information on the Summit, go to Blue Planet Summit

Photo Gallery of the Blue Planet Summit


To change our world’s energy culture: Blue Planet Foundation

To change our world’s energy culture: Blue Planet Foundation PDF Print E-mail

Main NEWS Section - Environmental Events
By Suzanne Westerly
News From Indian Country 4-08

hawaii-group-large.gifStudent environmental activists came from near and far. From left: Anna Rose (Australia) Australian Student Environmental Network; Chelsea Chee (Navajo Nation) Black Mesa Water Coalition, Tribal Campus Climate Challenge (TCCC); Julie Rogers, biologist & daughter of Henk and Akemi Rogers; Cristian Beccera Monroy (Mexico), State Coordinator of GEO Juvenil Mexico, Environmental Commissioner of the Youth Network in Nayarit; Erda Rindrasih (Indonesia) University of Gadjah Mada, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Hawai’i (UH); and Shanah Trevenna, Sustainable Saunders, UH.

Blue Planet Foundation doesn’t think small. Their mission statement is To Change Our World’s Energy Culture

Hawai’i is a microcosm of our Earth. A location many think of as paradise. A perfect place to completely change our dependence on oil. Hawai’i has abundant natural resources – wind, waves, sunshine and geothermal (volcanic). The island of O’ahu (Gathering Place), opened its arms with aloha to host The Blue Planet Global Energy Summit from April 3rd through the 5th. This was Blue Planet Foundation’s first annual Summit for strategizing as well as beginning to put into effect programs regarding energy issues. The theme running through the conference was that of moving toward change in order to meet our energy needs today and for our future. Positive change requires cooperation, communication, and understanding across various interest groups, industries and national boundaries. It involves all of us. This can be done, according to Blue Planet Foundation, if there is a new vision for the way energy is generated, distributed and used.

hawiian-speaker.gif

Ramsay Taum, Native Hawai’ian Culture & Sustainability, University of Hawai’i, Co-Founder of Sustain Hawai’i

Philanthropist Henk Rogers founded the Blue Planet Foundation because of his commitment to our environment. As a result of his entrepreneurship in the computer-technology-world, Rogers was able to pull Blue Planet Energy Summit for brainstorming and promoting the use of non-carbon, environmentally friendly, clean energy sources while also talking about the economic benefits of protecting our environment.

The three-day event was taped for two upcoming television shows. DVD’s for academic, legislative and civic use will also be available offering inspiration to people around our world. Henk Rogers believes, “The human imagination has the power and ability to solve our energy challenge.”

Over sixty influential leaders in the environmental and energy fields participated in the Summit. Well-known speakers such as Robert F. Kennedy Jr., environmental attorney, author, activist; Dennis Hayes, Earth Day Founder, Professor, President of the Bullitt Foundation; Dr. Heidi Cullen, scientist, climate expert at the Weather Channel; Ramsay Taum, Director of External Relations and Community Partnerships at the University of Hawa’i School of Travel Industry Management and Co-Director of Sustain Hawai’i; and Dr. Stephen H. Schneider, Nobel Prize winner and professor, were just a few of the speakers that
participated in the Summit.

Student’s Share Their Concerns


An important component in the Summit, was that of students from around the world. It’s vital that the younger generations have a prominent voice at all discussions – they are the future leaders, and have much to offer.

The student environmental activists from near and far were: Chelsea Chee (Navajo Nation), Black Mesa Water Coalition and who works with the Indigenous Environmental Network; Erda Rindrasih (Indonesia) University of Gadjah Mada, Urban and Regional Planning, UH; Cristian Beccera Monroy (Mexico), State Coordinator of GEO Juvenile Mexico, Environmental Commissioner of the Youth Network in Nayarit; Anna Rose (Australia) Australian Student Environmental Network; Silvia Gianetti Barber, Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH; and Shanah Trevenna, Sustainable Saunders, UH.

During a panel presentation Gal Luft, with Institute for Analysis of Global Security, declared nuclear energy safe and clean. Chelsea Chee, (Dine’) Tribal Campus Challenge Coordinator with Black Mesa Water Coalition and Indigenous Environmental Network, took issue with his statement. “I don’t see nuclear energy as clean energy.”

Chelsea Chee expressed her first hand knowledge of the pain, suffering and deaths the Navajo people continue to endure because of the toxic legacy left behind by corporations who mined for uranium on the Navajo Nation for almost 40 years, beginning in the late 1940s. Sites never cleaned up, tailings blowing in the wind, entering their water supply. In 2006 the Navajo Nation voted to ban uranium mining on their land. The majority of those at the Summit agreed with Chelsea Chee.

Not Just Talk, but Action!

Blue Planet Foundation has teamed up with Evolution Sage to create an innovative Energy Returned on Energy Invested Program with Nanakuli High School.

Kevin Vaccarello, Director of Evolution Sage, Founder and Co-Director of Sustain Hawai’i, presented a brief overview of the Energy Invested Program’s hands-on approach that will teach the students at Nanakuli High School how they can personally affect change in the real world. Kevin Vaccarello explained, “Hot water and lighting account for about 50 percent of a homes energy use, so we said, let’s look at all the best solutions that are out there.” Based on those facts, the creation of a learning experience evolved for the benefit of the students.

They will be asked to submit a “Walk Story with Blue Planet” Essay via Blue Planet’s website and explain what the energy, water and money saved means to them, their family, their community and their world. The best 20+ essays will win a partial energy and water efficiency retrofit for their homes in the way of LED bulbs, faucet aerators, and low-flow showerheads (they’re better than they used to be).

Their project isn’t over yet!! After having their homes retrofitted, the Nanakuli High School students will track the difference in energy and water consumption from the previous year to determine how much energy, water and money their family is saving. The families will pledge to use those savings to further support the student’s education or use it for more sustainability-oriented solutions. Each household should save nearly $300/yr for over 20 years, which cumulatively for all households is more than $150,000 over the lifetime of the LED bulbs, low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators.

By actually participating in bettering ones life, the students as well as their teachers, will bring a new perspective to their energy uses, and the knowledge they have acquired will ripple through their family and community in many positive ways.

Nanakuli’s Principal, Darin Pilialoha, is an enthusiastic supporter of the program, “I see this is a great opportunity not only for the students to participate, but also for the school to participate in.” Perhaps the program will generate even more innovative energy ideas from the students themselves. Even better, this pilot program can be used in schools throughout the country and world.

Organic Farming

Although not a central issue during the conference, organic farming is another sustainability issue of grave importance. Solomon Enos, artist, and cultural activist enjoys teaching students about their cultural ties to Hawai’i as the project assistant of the five-acre Mala ‘Ai ‘Opio (MA’O) nonprofit farm. The farm is run by the Waianae Community Re-Development Corporation with funding from the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Solomon Enos is the son of farmer and paniolo (cowboy) Eric Enos.

Hawai’i looking Forward

Hawaii can play a lead role in advancing the use of the many alternative energies presently available to us. As people voice their commitment to change, the political and business leaders will listen, and help bring funding to environmentally sound energy programs.

Here in Hawai’i, the world’s most remote island chain, we are extremely vulnerable to possible interruptions in our supply chain so it’s vital for us to wean ourselves from a dependence on oil while thoughtfully and earnestly making the change to renewable energy use while thoughtfully conserving energy in our everyday uses.

“In Hawai’i we can easily measure our fossil fuel use, just by counting the tankers that come in,” Henk Rogers noted. Because of this, he feels Hawai’i is the perfect place to measure our change in energy usage. The question he asks is why aren’t we using our natural resources such as wind, waves, geothermal and solar.

“The human imagination has the power and ability to solve our energy challenge.”

On The Net:
http://www.blueplanetsummit.org/

http://www.evolutionsage.com/
http://hawaiianislandsphotojournal.blogspot.com

Tuesday, April 1

Unusual Abode




Somewhere on O'ahu you may come upon this whimsical house

Tuesday, March 4

Ballet of Molten Glass



It's fascinating to watch Krista Woodward's hand ballet of molten glass as she melts and sculpts glass rods into enchanting ocean creatures. Krista is a lampworking glass artist.

Krista's most sought-after pieces are her flowing tropical fish that appear ready to swim away ~ aha . . . Oceans in Glass!

Wearing protective glasses, Krista turns on the 5,400 degree flaming hot torch, and chooses the glass tubes she'll use for her latest seahorse.

In order to prevent the rods from cracking due to the thermal shock, she introduces clear and colored glass rods slowly into the flame. As the glass becomes molten, Krista pulls, pinches, spins, embellishes, and lovingly manipulates the glass into wonderful sea life.

The finished lampwork is then annealed, meaning, heated very slowly at 1050 degrees, until its temperature reaches a stress-relief point, where the temperature of the glass is too hard to deform, but still soft enough for internal stresses to ease. The piece is then heat-soaked until its temperature is uniform throughout, then slowly cooled until its temperature is below a critical point, where it can't generate internal stresses. This process helps to insure the piece won't crack or shatter due to minor temperature change or other shock.

Lampworking has been around since ancient times. It became popular in 14th century Italy, and again in 19th century France. Today, lampworkers have higher tech torches, but the art is the same. Lampworkers begin with glass rods, sometimes infusing metal oxides like tin, cobalt, gold and silver into their sculptures for a variety of looks.

Oceans in Glass is a dreamlike gallery of colorful glass sculptures sparkling in the sunlight ~ some are hanging, some are on interesting pedestals of gnarled tree roots ~ "harvested without harming the trees," Krista explained to me as we strolled through the gallery looking at her pieces and those of several other artists.

Krista grew up in New England attending Waldorf Schools where her artistic talents blossomed. Upon coming to Hawai'i 18 years ago, she apprenticed under a Master Lampworker for four years. Today after seventeen years of lampworking, Krista is herself a Master, and has apprentices of her own.

Krista finds inspiration for her sculptures while snorkeling and diving around tropical coral reefs in Hawai'i's crystalline turquoise waters.

It's very cool to watch Krista or one of her apprentices shape a sculpture of colored glass before your very eyes!


Krista will create custom pieces for you if you ask, as well as ship them to you - guaranteed undamaged.

No, Krista doesn't have a website. She's already quite busy keeping up with the demand for her beautiful sculptures. One person can only do so much! Stop by Oceans in Glass, you'll be glad you did, it'll make you smile.

Oceans in Glass Gallery is located between a gorgeous old grandaddy ficus tree, and the Hale'iwa Surf Museum, a great little museum, in the Marketplace Shopping Center in Hale'iwa along the Kamehameha Highway on O'ahu's North Shore. George Atkins is the owner of Oceans in Glass and the nearby Hale'iwa Art Gallery.


Watch the entire sculpting process here

Monday, November 17

Island Pow Wows

11-17-2003

Westerly, Suzanne
News From Indian Country

Island Pow Wows

Warm breezes in the land of never-ending-summer welcomed Native Americans from the "mainland" for three consecutive weekends of pow wows on three of the Hawaiian islands this fall. Having a pow wow in Hawaii gave Native Americans living here a touch of home, and spectators the opportunity to
see the skillful dancers dressed in beautifully handcrafted regalia. The
29th Annual American Indian Pow wow, held October 4-5 on Oahu, was the only
powwow of the three that had competition dancing.

September 27-28, the 10th Annual Waimea Powwow was held on the Big Island,
or Hawaii. Buttons Lovell (Cherokee/Hawaiian) is a Sundancer who missed
being at pow ...

Monday, December 30

Wisconsin’s Natives Tell Their Own Histories [Full Story]

December 30, 2002


Wisconsin’s Natives Tell Their Own Histories

By Suzanne Westerly
December 30, 2002

Like branches weighed down by a heavy snowfall, the 12 Indian nations of Wisconsin have been burdened with the weight of almost 200 winters of traumatic events. But like branches after a spring thaw, these nations are again standing strong today.

Author Patty Loew, Ph.D., an enrolled member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, has written a powerful and important new book, “Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Renewal.” In her book, Loew weaves together origin stories, ancient songs, art, and symbolism with the historical perspectives of Wisconsin’s first people. She also discusses the critical Native issues of today: the economic and political developments along with the ongoing struggles over the environment, treaty rights, and sovereignty.

Lowe has long been frustrated by books about Wisconsin’s Natives based on “white” sources: missionary accounts, traders’ journals, and government documents. When asked to write the text for a large exhibit on Indian nations for Wisconsin’s sesquicentennial, Loew enthusiastically accepted. It was an opportunity to educate the state’s residents about the Natives’ triumphs over centuries of injustice.

Loew’s intensive research led to her absorbing “Indian Nations of Wisconsin.” You’ll find yourself reading every word, even the chapter notes in the back, and checking her recommended resources (videotapes, CD-ROMs, Web sites) and further reading. This book should be part of Wisconsin’s the high school curriculum, but it’s valuable for anyone interested in a genuine history of the state.

In the preface Loew writes, “I have attempted to use as many Native sources as possible: speeches delivered by chiefs during treaty negotiations, origin stories, songs, legends, cave paintings, Native newspapers, and so on. I have tried to refer to the Native people as they refer to themselves. I use the word Haudenosaunee instead of Iroquois . . . Mesquakie instead of Fox . . . Anishinabe or Ojibwe instead of Chippewa.”

In exploring Wisconsin’s rich Native heritage, Loew has created compact yet comprehensive tribal histories. We learn about the uniqueness of each Indian community: the Ho-Chunk, Menominee, Potawatomi, Oneida, Mohican, Brothertown (not federally recognized), and six bands of Ojibwe. Loew mentions their relations with the Dakota, Sauk, Mesquakie, Mascouten, Kickapoo, and other tribes.

As Loew explains, with the advent of French and English fur traders, life for Wisconsin’s Natives would never be the same. The traders introduced firearms, debilitating alcohol, and a variety of European goods that Natives became dependent on, to the detriment of their way of life. Soon came devastating waves of European diseases and missionaries, who imposed Christianity on the Natives, often forcefully.

To better elucidate history, Loew discusses how Euro-American wars (the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Civil War, World War I and II) triggered problems for Wisconsin’s tribes, especially the unrelenting encroachment onto their lands. We learn why Natives chose to fight with or against the French, English, and Americans.

Loew exposes the truth about U.S. treaties with Wisconsin’s tribes. For hundreds of years, and still today, Wisconsin’s Natives have determinedly fought for a land base as coercive treaties have taken their homelands. For instance, Loew describes the dilemma of the Brothertown Tribe of Wisconsin. In 1878, Congress acknowledged Brothertown as a tribe but appointed five trustees to oversee the sale of unallotted Brothertown land. Today, the tribe works optimistically to become federally recognized again.

Throughout her book Loew illustrates the significant impact the French, English, and American governments have had on Wisconsin’s Natives. Damaging government policies have included the establishment of reservations; allotment and fractionalization; the Browning ruling, which sent children to boarding schools; the Indian Reorganization Act; the New Deal assimilation programs; and termination and relocation.

We also learn about the victories of admirable warriors such as war chief Little Turtle (Miami), Tecumseh (Shawnee), Black Hawk (Sauk), and Chief Buffalo (Ojibwe). Bringing us into contemporary times, Loew touches upon modern day warriors: the activists in the pan-Indian and Red Power movements, the American Indian Movement (AIM), and individuals like Dorothy Davids.

“They tried to erase us,” said Davids (Mohican) of the boarding schools Indian children were forced to attend. She was the first American Indian woman to graduate from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, going on to earn a master’s degree. Davids acknowledged the positive side of the boarding-school experience: learning to read and write. Eventually, she said, “We were able to stand up and criticize some of the government’s policies.”

One conflict started in 1974 when two Ojibwe brothers, Mike and Fred Tribble of Lac Courte Oreilles, were arrested for ice fishing on a lake off their reservation but within territory the Ojibwe claimed for hunting and fishing. In Chapter 5, Loew quotes one of the brothers: “When they said I was doing it illegally,” Mike Tribble recounted, “I took the treaty out of my back pocket and I said, ‘No, I’m doing this under treaty rights.’”

When the Ojibwe went spear-fishing the following year, angry protestors tried to stop them with legal action, political pressure, death threats, and violence, including gunshots fired at boats. The Ojibwe and their supporters fought back with nonviolent tactics. By 1991, the U.S. Supreme Court reaffirmed the right of the Lake Superior Ojibwe to hunt, fish, and gather on lands ceded in Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

“Indian Nations of Wisconsin” shows repeatedly that, despite tremendous adversity, Native Americans have always had enough resilience to adapt and succeed. Now they’re a growing political power.

Wisconsin’s Native nations are experiencing a renaissance, Loew writes. Many are reaping the economic benefits of Indian gaming. They’re funding projects such as roads, health-care services, elder housing, community centers, schools, and Head Start. They’re building an economic infrastructure and seeing entrepreneurship blossom.

Casino profits are helping in other ways. Tribes are cleaning up environmental messes and hiring attorneys to fight mining companies and other corporations that have ravaged tribal lands.

Loew also notes how Wisconsin’s Natives are returning to their cultural roots rather than leaving the reservations behind. She attributes this in part to the availability of education, jobs, and other advantages non-Natives take for granted.

Loew superbly integrates volumes of information, fascinating photographs, and insightful interviews into “Indian Nations of Wisconsin.” She leaves the reader feeling hopeful in her engrossing and enlightening new book.

Patty Loew, a recipient of the Outstanding Service Award of the Great Lakes Intertribal Council, is an assistant professor in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a producer for WHA-TV (PBS), and co-host of a weekly news and public affairs program on Public Television in Wisconsin. She has produced several award-winning documentaries and written dozens of scholarly and general-interest articles on Native topics.

“Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Renewal” is published by the Wisconsin Historical Society Press (www.shsw.wisc.edu/publications). Suzanne Westerly can be reached at suzannewesterly@earthlink.net


Thursday, October 31

Protesters march on SRP to save Zuni Salt Lake

10-31-2002
News From Indian Country

Zuni and Hopi runners arrived at Papago Park in Phoenix the morning of Oct.
14 after a 300-mile run which began at Zuni Pueblo Tribal Headquarters.
About 100 supporters from the Zuni Salt Lake Coalition were waiting at the
park to welcome the runners.

The group's goal on this Columbus Day was to deliver a strong message to
William Schrader, president of Arizona's largest power company, Salt River
Project (SRP): Drop SRP's plans for the Fence Lake Coal Mine so Zuni Salt
Lake and other sacred sites will not be harmed.

"We're using our tradition of running to deliver our message to tribes and
others about what SRP is planning to do," said Carlton ...

the rest

Saturday, June 15

Celebrating outstanding achievements by Native performers Celebrating outstanding achievements by Native performers, full story

Canku Ota Logo

Canku Ota

Canku Ota Logo

(Many Paths)

An Online Newsletter Celebrating Native America

June 15, 2002 - Issue 63

pictograph divider

Celebrating Outstanding Achievements by Native Performers

by Suzanne Westerly, Photojournalist
All photos copyright © 2002 of Suzanne Westerly

As the sun melted into the ocean, people began gathering at the ritzy Century City Plaza Hotel in Beverly Hills for the 10 th Annual First Americans in the Arts (FAITA) extravaganza on February 2nd. Beautifully attired women and men greeted old friends and caught up on what had been happening in each other's lives, exchanged business cards and talked about future events.

Inside the beautiful room where dinner was served followed by the award show, were three large IMAX screens which allowed everyone unrestricted visibility of the presenters, award winners, the entertainment, and the wonderful film clips that preceded each award winner.

Over ten years ago, FAITA Vice Chairperson Dawn Jackson (Saginaw Chippewa), and Chairman Bob Hicks (Creek/Seminole) saw the importance of recognizing "Native performers in the arts; representing theater, stage, film, television and music," explained Dawn. They felt Native performers weren't getting the recognition they deserved. Thus FAITA was born.

The evening was hosted by the irrepressibly charming Wes Studi, (Cherokee), who had the audience laughing throughout the night. Later, Charlie Hill (Oneida) who was one of the presenters, had everyone laughing too, as seen in the accompanying photo.

Here are just a few of the happenings from the recent evening at the FAITA's.

Irene Bedard (Inupiat Eskimo/Cree), received the award for Best Guest Performance by an actress in her role as a CIA agent in the TV show, The Agency. Upon accepting, Irene laughed and said she had fun playing one of the roles many actors hope to play -- a CIA agent.

Presenting the award for best actor in a TV series to Mitch Longely for his role in Judging Amy, was actor, Floyd Red Crow Westerman (Dakota Sioux), and actress Kateri Walker (Ojibway/Odawa/Potowatomi), both previous FAITA winners.

Among the entertainment of the evening was two-time Grammy winner and musical legend, Rita Coolidge (Cherokee/Scottish). Introducing the song she would sing, Rita said, "I'm going to do just a couple of versus from a song that is considered the Cherokee National anthem, because it was the song most sung on the Trail of Tears." With her beautiful velvety voice, Rita sang Amazing Grace acappella in Cherokee.

Later that evening, Rita was honored with FAITA's Lifetime Achievement Award. But prior to her introduction, a wonderful film collage highlighting Rita's 30 years as a singer was shown on the big screens.

Introducing Rita, Mary Youngblood (Chugach Aleut/Seminole), Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Chad Smith, and his wife Bobbi, articulated Rita's many accomplishments.

The beautifully elegant Rita Coolidge then walked on stage smiling as the audience applauded. With a laugh, she said, "My gosh, when I look at that footage it makes me feel like I've been around a lot longer than I remembered."

Talking with Rita before the FAITA ceremony, she said she would be leaving the next Tuesday to sing at the Opening Ceremony at the Olympics where Rita, her sister Priscilla, and Priscilla's daughter Laura Satterfield, performed along side Robbie Robertson.

Recipient of the award for Outstanding Achievement in Dance was the very exhilarated Marla Bingham (Wampanoag from Mashpee/black), who seemed to float as she came across the stage. Marla is an internationally known dancer and choreographer, and the founder of the Marla Bingham Contemporary Ballet Company.

After the show, Kateri had fun posing for photos with N. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache), who expressed himself "artistically" with his outfit, as you can see in the photo. "I wanted to reflect the surroundings from the world we live in today," he explained. "Floyd told me he liked the outfit, and asked what it meant. I told him, it's sort of a new take on the shades-and-braids look," said Bird laughing. "The term apple (in rhinestones on his shirt) is such an ironic and contradictory term that Indians use against each other. Nobody ever publicly references it; it's a colloquialist term. I wanted to be thought provoking, not to rebel against anything -- I just want to raise individual consciousness." He continued, "I think we are naturally philosophers and thoughtful people, and I want people to think about language." Bird's other persona is as the person who runs the Native American Program at the Sundance Institute, and programmer for Sundance Film Festival in Los Angeles.

The band Redbone played at the party following the award presentations. Those who wanted to be able to actually hear each other talk, mingled outside the party room. Reluctant to let the night end, and not wanting to leave friends they rarely get to spend time with, some people stayed up all night and welcomed in the new days sun.

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Actor Zahn McClarnon (Hunkpapa Dakota/Irish)

Veteran actor Saginaw Grant (Creek), and Tim Sampson (Creek), who is appearing in the Broadway production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo¹s Nest, received a FAITA award for Theater.

Comedienne Charlie Hill (Oneida) and actor Floyd Red Crow Westerman (Dakota Sioux)

Actress Kateri Walker (Ojibway, Odawa, Potowatomi), past FAITA award winner and a presenter this year with actor, writer, publisher Harrison Lowe (Diné)
Actress Kateri Walker (Ojibway, Odawa, Potowatomi) with N. Bird Runningwater (Mescalero Apache, Cheyenne)
Apensanahkwat (Menominee Chief), Max¹s date, Steve Reevis (Blackfeet), actor and activist Max Gail, and Macile Reevis
What Bird looks likes most days as the chairman of the board for Native Americans in Philanthropy, and advisor to the Sundance Institute's Native Film Program.
Actor Miko Hughes (Chickasaw)
Stuntman David Alvarado (Karankawa/Tonkawa)
Award winner Molly Culver (Choctaw)
Stuntman and actor Henry Kingi, Sr. (Cherokee/Black/Anglo) received a FAITA award for Lifetime Achievement in Stunts
Melonie Mathews and Miss Indian World, Ke Aloha May Cody Alo (White Mountain Apache/Hawaiian)
Choreographer and dancer Marla Bingham (Wampanoag from Mashpee) received the Award for Technical Achievement, with actor Andrew Roa (Shasta and Oaxaca)

Actor Steve Reevis, (Blackfeet)

Actor Timothy Vahle, (Choctaw)
Actor Mitch Longely - FAITA Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a TV Series
Michael Horse (Zuni, Yaqui, Mescalero and Apache)
FAITA Vice Chair Dawn Jackson (Saginaw Chippewa), Chairman Bob Hicks (Creek and Seminole) and FAITA producer, Jackie Kane
(The photos of Rita and Priscilla (bottom) and Laura Satterfield (top) were taken in November at the Native American Music Awards in Albuquerque, NM)
Actor Apensanahkwat (Menominee Chief) with actor Michael Greyeyes (Cree)
Flutist Mary Youngblood (Chugach Aleut/Seminole) Rita Coolidge (Cherokee) with friend, talking with Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation, Chad Smith
Actor Floyd Red Crow Westerman, (Dakota Sioux) Actress Sophia Gerodimous, James Main Jr. (GrosVentre), Actor Steve Reevis (Blackfeet) and wife Macile, and friend